Immigration Trough Adoption. Understanding The Hague Process

Immigration through Adoption: Hague ProcessThe process of adopting a child was always very sensitive from the economic and legal point of view, especially when it comes up to intercountry adoption (when the child lives in a different country). In this case, the Immigrant Law plays its role, making the whole situation even harder. Everyone going through this procedure has to deal with Hague Convention, and the best decision that a potential parent can make before starting the process – is to hire a professional adoption lawyer that will assist you in your case. But first, let’s have a deeper insight into the concept of “Hague Process”.

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How to Apply for K-1 Fiancé(e) Visa and K-2 Visa

K-1-BannerIt`s not new for us that people from one country with its specific culture can marry people who live in other country with different culture. So, if you are a foreigner and you plan to marry a citizen of the United States, the following information would be highly useful for you.

There is so called a K-1 non-immigrant visa, also known as a Fiancé(e) visa. This type of visa is designed for the foreign nationals coming to the United States to marry American citizens and live here. It permits the foreigners to travel to the United States and marry his or her U.S. citizen sponsor within 90 days of arrival.

But if you plan to marry a foreign national outside the United States or your fiancé(e) is already residing legally in the U.S., you do not need to file for a K-1 visa.

How do you like the fact that during 2013, there were 173 million non-immigrant admissions to the United States and 26,046 of these admissions were fiancé(e) visas (K-1). You can read about this in U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

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What to Expect on Your Naturalization Test

A lonaturalizationt of people want to take the naturalization test but in the most of cases they don’t know what it contains. To become a naturalized U.S. citizen, you must pass the naturalization test. The naturalization test has two components:

  1. English Test
  2. Civics Test.

During your naturalization interview, you will be asked questions about your application and background. You must keep in mind that you are under oath and you have to tell only the truth. You will also take an English and civics test unless you qualify for an exemption or waiver.

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Deciding to Immigrate? Top Ten Tips for a Successful U.S. Immigration

Deciding to immigrate involves a lot of research planning and reassessment of your current life. Here are the top immigration tips for you to follow:

  1. Plan everything in details. If you are already in the USA and you need renewal of your documents, you must apply in advance. Most green cards are valid only for 10 years. In case your green card or immigration visa has expired, and you haven’t a new one, you can be arrested or deported. In order to avoid these things it will be good for you to plan everything in advance.download
  2. Think about citizenship in the USA. In case you already have a green card, and you want to live permanently in the USA, it will be necessary to file for U.S. citizenship as soon as the laws allow you to do it. You should know that you may apply for citizenship 5 years after you receive your green card or 3/less years if your green card is obtained through marriage.Ways-to-get-All-or-USA-Citizenship-for-any-Overseas-Husband-or-wife
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What to Expect on Your Naturalization Test

   naturalizationA lot of people want to take the naturalization test but in the most of cases they don’t know what it contains. To become a naturalized U.S. citizen, you must pass the naturalization test.  The naturalization test has two components:

  1. English Test
  2. Civics Test.

During your naturalization interview, you will be asked questions about your application and background. You must keep in mind that you are under oath and you have to tell only the truth. You will also take an English and civics test unless you qualify for an exemption or waiver.

englishusaThe English Test has three parts:

  1. Oral Test 
  2. Reading Test
  3. Writing test 

unnamedThe second part of the naturalization test is Civics Test. The civics test contains questions about U.S. history and government. Follow the link below to find educational materials, such as Civics Flash Cards, to help you prepare for the naturalization interview: http://www.uscis.gov/citizenship/learners/study-test/study-materials-civics-test

Generally, during the naturalization interview, applicants are asked up to 10 questions from the list of 100 questions in English. The applicant should answer correctly 6 of the 10 questions to pass the civics test in English.

There are some exceptions from the naturalization test requirements. 

In the case when an applicant fails any portion of test during the initial examination, USCIS will reschedule the application for a second examination between 60 and 90 days after the initial examination. In the case when an applicant fails any portion of the naturalization test a second time, the officer will deny the application.

If you complete the Eligibility Worksheet and have questions about your eligibility, you should seek advice by consulting an attorney.

If you want to take the naturalization test, please watch our video. This video alsoU_S__Citizenship_ includes exceptions from the naturalization test requirements. If you need legal advise, don’t hesitate to contact an experienced attorney who will provide you with the best assistance and help. You can come with any legal problem to Legal Bistro and our qualified lawyers will be interested to work with you on a contingent fee basis. The service for you will be 100% free so you have nothing to lose!

Have a Dream to Become a U.S. Citizen? Find out How to Get U.S. Citizenship

All of us have benefits of citizenship. But when people are not citizens they do not have enough rights and the process of citizenship is rather difficult.

3e7ff4dcc30098c7ec22c062136fd2d3Citizenship means being a member of a country with all the rights and all the privileges of being citizen. If a person meets certain requirements he can become a U.S. citizen. People may become  U.S. citizens at birth or after it.

According to U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), 757,343 persons were naturalized in 2012.

To become a citizen at birth a person should:

  1. have been born in the United States;
  2. have been born in certain territories or outlying possessions of the United States;
  3. have a parent or parents who were citizens at the time of his birth.

A person may become a citizen after birth by:

  1. Applying for a “derived” or “acquired” citizenship through parents
  2. Applying for naturalization.

The ways to obtain Citizenship are:

  1. Citizenship Through Naturalization
  2. Citizenship Through Parents
  3. Naturalization for Spouses of U.S. citizens
  4. Citizenship for Military personnel and Family members.

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Immigration: Years Before Becoming Citizens

The naturalization process confers U.S. citizenship upon foreign citizens or nationals who have fulfilled the requirements established by Congress in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). After naturalization, foreign-born citizens enjoy nearly all of the same benefits, rights, and responsibilities that the Constitution gives to native-born U.S. citizens, including the right to vote.

According to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, 757 434 persons naturalized during 2012.

Screenshot from 2013-05-25 17:11:30The Naturalization Process

An applicant for naturalization must fulfill certain requirements set forth in the INA concerning age, lawful admission and residence in the United States. These general naturalization provisions specify that a foreign national must be at least 18 years of age; be a U.S. legal permanent resident (LPR); and have resided in the country continuously for at least five years. Additional requirements include the ability to speak, read, and write the English language; knowledge of the U.S. government and history; and good moral character.

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