Green Card – Don’t Let Your Dreams of Living in the U.S.A. be Dreams

Have you ever considered living in the United States of America? If yes, let’s find out about the possibilities you have to make your dream come true.

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In order to live in United States you need to get a permanent visa or a Green Card.

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A Green Card is a permanent visa that allows a citizen of another country to live and work legally in the U.S.A. This document may be used as evidence that you are an authorized permanent¬† resident of U.S. and it may be considered to be the first step towards becoming a naturalized citizen. The major benefit of obtaining a Green Card is that this document doesn’t have any time restriction.

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Asking yourself how to get a Green Card? Well, there are a couple of ways to obtain it. You can receive a Green Card if an immediate member of your family already has it. Another way would be if you get an offer of employment in the U.S. If you invest in a commercial enterprise with at least 10 permanent full time jobs you can become a holder of a Green Card.

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Immigration: Years Before Becoming Citizens

The naturalization process confers U.S. citizenship upon foreign citizens or nationals who have fulfilled the requirements established by Congress in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). After naturalization, foreign-born citizens enjoy nearly all of the same benefits, rights, and responsibilities that the Constitution gives to native-born U.S. citizens, including the right to vote.

According to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, 757 434 persons naturalized during 2012.

Screenshot from 2013-05-25 17:11:30The Naturalization Process

An applicant for naturalization must fulfill certain requirements set forth in the INA concerning age, lawful admission and residence in the United States. These general naturalization provisions specify that a foreign national must be at least 18 years of age; be a U.S. legal permanent resident (LPR); and have resided in the country continuously for at least five years. Additional requirements include the ability to speak, read, and write the English language; knowledge of the U.S. government and history; and good moral character.

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