U.S. Citizenship for Military Personnel

Many people are surprised to hear that members of the MilitaryFamilyU.S. military and their families have issues with the U.S. immigration system. But unfortunately it happens very often.

Members of the U.S. armed forces and their dependents (spouses and children) may be eligible for naturalization, to include expedited and overseas processing, under special provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

Did you know that Since September 2002, USCIS has naturalized 89,095 members of the military ( Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services)

It is very important to know the Military branches (also service branch or armed service):

  • imagesArmy
  • Navy
  • Marine Corps
  • Air Force
  • Coast Guard
  • National Guard
  • Selected Reserve

 

Remember that there are some requirements and qualifications for serving in the U.S. Armed Forces!

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Naturalization. How to Obtain U.S. Citizenship through Naturalization.

Naturalization is the process by which U.S. citizenship is granted to a foreign citizen or national after the requirements established by Congress in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) are fulfilled. According to U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 757,434 persons were naturalized in 2012.Citizenship-throughNaturalization1

Naturalization is a complex process. It has some general requirements:

  • Be age 18 or older;
  • Be a permanent resident for a certain amount of time (5 years or 3 years)
  • Be a person of good moral character
  • Have a basic knowledge of U.S. Government
  • Have a period of continuous and physical presence in the U.S.
  • Be able to speak, read and write in English.

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Immigration: Years Before Becoming Citizens

The naturalization process confers U.S. citizenship upon foreign citizens or nationals who have fulfilled the requirements established by Congress in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). After naturalization, foreign-born citizens enjoy nearly all of the same benefits, rights, and responsibilities that the Constitution gives to native-born U.S. citizens, including the right to vote.

According to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, 757 434 persons naturalized during 2012.

Screenshot from 2013-05-25 17:11:30The Naturalization Process

An applicant for naturalization must fulfill certain requirements set forth in the INA concerning age, lawful admission and residence in the United States. These general naturalization provisions specify that a foreign national must be at least 18 years of age; be a U.S. legal permanent resident (LPR); and have resided in the country continuously for at least five years. Additional requirements include the ability to speak, read, and write the English language; knowledge of the U.S. government and history; and good moral character.

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