Find Out If You Are Eligible for a J-1 Visa

J-1

The J-1 Visa or Exchange Visitor Program was first implemented in 1961 as part of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961. The idea behind this act was to promote the understanding of other cultures by the people of the United States and likewise the understanding of the America culture by people of other countries through educational and cultural exchanges.

The J-1 Visa is a non-immigrant, cultural exchange visa issued through the Exchange Visitor Program.

The J-1 classification (exchange visitors) is authorized for those who intend to participate in an approved sponsor program for the purpose of teaching, instructing or lecturing, studying, observing, conducting research, consulting, demonstrating special skills, receiving training, or to receive graduate medical education or training.

Individuals who qualify for J-1 status if sponsored through an accredited Exchange Visitor Program include:

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Key Features of Getting the H-1B Visa!

Nobody will deny that sometimes our workbored makes us bored, to sit up endlessly in the office staring at your computer monitor is not a work we are dreaming about. Everybody dreams of a better life. Have you ever thought about combining working and traveling?

The H-1B Visa can help your dream come true!

b7b0fd7545bb64ca4c0b319e066a6facBusiness companies from the U.S. use the H-1B Visa program to employ foreign workers in specialty occupations that require theoretical or practical application of a body of highly specialized knowledge, including, but not limited to: engineers, scientists, or computer programmers ( to see list of all specialty occupations, watch our video below).

Speaking about working immigration, there is an interesting fact that in 2012, there were 165 million non-immigrant admissions to the United States. 473,015 of these admissions were workers in specialty occupations! The H-1Visa has current annual numerical limit, or cap, of 65,000 visas per fiscal year.

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Working in the United States. Dream or Reality?

kangarooAre you from Australia? Are you a good qualified specialist, but you still can’t find a good and well paid job? Are you tired to run after kangaroos? Have you ever reflected about working in the United States? E-3 Visa is exactly what you need!

Do you know that during 2012, there were 165 million non-immigrant admissions to the United States, and 386,742 of these admissions were E-1 to E-3 Visas.

So, if you are a national of Australia, and want to work in the United States, you need to apply for E-3 Visa, as E-3 Visa is eligible only for nationals of Australia, their spouses and unmarried children under 21 years of age. Big advantage of E-3 Visa is the fact that spouses of E-3 visa holders may work in the United States without any restrictions. (Spouse will need to file a I-765 Form, Application for Employment Authorization). Note: Children on an E-3 Visa are not permitted to work!Aurtalia+USA

E-3 Visa is a multiple-entry visa valid for 24 months! Applicants may enter the U.S. up to ten days before the start date of their employment, and may remain in the U.S. for up to ten days after the end of their employment.

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What is a Family-Based Visa and How to Get One?

family-petitions-charlotte-nc-immigration-lawyer

Nowadays people from all over the world aspire to live in the United States and leave their home countries. Immigrants go through a hefty process wanting to end up where you are now in the U.S., living with independence and freedom. But, immigrants can’t walk into the United States even if they have family members who live in the U.S., they’re required to go through a series of steps that can take years just to be with the ones that they love.

  • During 2012, there were 1,031,631 immigrant admissions to the United States.
  • 680,799 of these admissions were Family-sponsored immigrants.

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Naturalization Ceremony – Oath of Allegiance

The Oath of Allegiance is held next to an American flag during a Special Naturalization Ceremony at the U.S. Treasury Department in Washington

The United States is a nation of immigrants. There are many steps involved in the process of becoming a citizen of the United States, and since 9/11, the process is even more difficult and time sensitive. However, the process, once completed, is gratifying and well worth the effort.

immigrants_us_citizen_testWhen you are on the home stretch of the whole process, you’ll be invited to take the Oath of Allegiance, which will complete the process of becoming a U.S. citizen.

Before the ceremony, you’ll get a Notice of Naturalization Oath (Form N-445) with the date, time and location of your scheduled naturalization ceremony.

NOTE: Failing to appear more than once for your ceremony may lead to a denial of your application.

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What is a Business Visa and How to Apply for One

visa

Business Visa also known as a B1 visa –  is a non-immigrant visa to the USA. It is available for anyone who would like to travel to the U.S. for a short period of time for business related reasons that do not require actual labor work or receiving payment from any U.S. company. A business visa is appropriate for a variety of activities of a commercial or professional nature including, but not limited to:

  • Attending a scientific, educational, professional or business convention or conference on specific dates;
  • Participating in sporting or charity events;
  • Collaboration on independent research at a scientific or educational institution;
  • Short- term training;
  • Meetings with the business partners or negotiating a contract;
  • Settling an estate;
  • Transiting through the U.S. under certain conditions.

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International Human Rights

declarationThe Article 1 from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights says “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in the spirit of brotherhood.” All human rights are inherent to all human beings, regardless their nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, color, religion, language or any other status.

 

We are equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination. Our rights are interrelated, interdependent, indivisible.The protection of fundamental human rights was the basis in the establishment of the United States over 200 years ago. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was created to make people respect human rights.

human rightsIn the vision of the United States, human rights are meant to:

  • prevent aggression
  • protect the peace
  • promote the rule of law
  • strive against crime and corruption
  • consolidate democracies
  • preclude humanitarian crises

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