First Amendment Violation: Separation Of Church And State

 

In a recent Wall Street Journal article written by Jacob Gershman entitled: For Next Big Religion Case, High Court Goes to Greece, is reported that the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to rule on a case whether an upstate New York town violated the Constitution by opening its public meetings with a Christian prayer.

The case centers on the Town of Greece, near Rochester, which had routinely invited Christian clergy to deliver prayers, most of which contained references to “Jesus Christ,” “Jesus,” “Your Son,” or the “Holy Spirit.”

Town residents claim the practice violated the separation of church and state of the First Amendment.

Constitutional scholar Carl Tobias, of the University of Richmond School of Law, said “It’s a very delicate and difficult issue”.

The outcome could have wider implications beyond legislative invocations, Mr. Tobias said. It could have an impact on everything from school prayer to what may be recited at funerals for state troopers.

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Talking Politics At Work Can Get You Fired

During the presidential elections political disagreements can easily arise in the workplace at any time. Usually such conversations can be heated and it does not matter whether you are on “red” or “blue” side or you consider yourself in the middle. The fact is that many private employers restrict political speech in the workplace.

In other words, sharing your opinion at work can get you fired. Susan Adams noted in Forbes that the Society for Human Resources reported 25% of employers maintained written policies. Some of these policies restrict having conversations about politics at work. Only a handful of states have laws that strictly prohibit private employers from discriminating against employees.

At least 80% of workers believe that they have a “free speech” right to have conversations on politics. They are absolutely wrong. The Fourth Amendment protects employees only from government interference but not employer interference. And maybe it is a high time to take a closer look at your employers’ written policies.

Some people believe if there is not any written policies at their company they can have a possibility to wear political buttons, T-shirts or they can outlaw political posters and instigate a conversation about hot-button issues during the lunch time. The answer to this question is NO.

The good news is that most employers are tolerant. 2/3 of the employers allow their workers to have a political discussion in their workplace as long as it does not interfere with work. And, of course, the employees remain respectful for that.

Do you think employers should be allowed to restrict the political speech of their employees? Please, share your opinion in the comments section below. 

More information can be found here: http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2012/09/12/why-you-shouldnt-talk-politics-at-work/

Chicago Panhandlers File a Class Action Lawsuit

 

Our constitutional rights under the First Amendment give all of us the right to speak what is on our mind.  According to a Wall Street Journal Blog posting by Sam Favate entitled: Chicago Panhandlers File First Amendment Lawsuit, eight Chicago panhandlers decided to enforce their rights by filing a federal lawsuit seeking class action status against the City of Chicago.  Their complaint was filed on the basis that the police make them move from a high end section of Michigan Avenue known as the “Magnificent Mile”.

Interestingly enough, this is not the first time that the City of Chicago has been faced with this type of lawsuit. In 2003., the City settled a class action lawsuit filed on behalf of people arrested or ticketed for panhandling.