Kermit Gosnell: Accusation Of Illegal Late-term Abortions

A recent Wall Street Journal article written by Peter Loftus and Louise Radnofsky entitled: “Abortion Doctor Convicted of Murder in Baby Deaths”, reports that a Philadelphia abortion doctor was declared to be guilty of first-degree murder in the deaths of three babies born alive.

The hot abortion debate was caused by a horrible case of 2009 when Kermit Gosnell, 72 years old, was convicted of involuntary manslaughter in the 2009 sedation-overdose death of a 41-year-old woman during an abortion procedure. Dr. Gosnell was found not guilty on a third-degree-murder charge in the woman’s death, and he was acquitted of first-degree murder of a fourth baby.

Dr. Gosnell can get the death penalty when the jury will return next week to reach its verdict on his case.

Opponents and supporters of abortion rights have seized on Dr. Gosnell’s case. Antiabortion activists, accusing Dr. Gosnell of the violence in terminating pregnancies, believe the issue of late-term abortions could influence Americans who support abortion rights. They believe there are at least some instances in which abortion should be illegal.

Other opinion accuses restrictive laws in Pennsylvania and many other states, where women with low-income have few possibilities to obtain quality care they need. That is why “inexpensive” Dr. Gosnell became so popular for poor and desperate women, despite his practice could be illegal, unethical and unsafe.

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Does the Surviving Boston Marathon Bomber Suspect Have to be Read Miranda Rights?!

In a recent article posted on the CNN website entitled: What are the Boston suspect’s legal rights?, was reported that Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the 19 year old Boston Marathon bombing suspect was put into prison Friday night.

Acoording to authorities, Dzhokar Tsarnaev was not read his Miranda rights when he was arrested. Miranda rights (also the Miranda Warning) is defined by Wikipedia as a warning given by police in the United States to criminal suspects in police custody (or in a custodial interrogation) before they are interrogated to preserve the admissibility of their statements against them in criminal proceedings.

The exact wording of the “Miranda Rights” statement is not specified in the Supreme Court’s historic decision. Instead, law enforcement agencies have created a basic set of simple statements that can be read to accused persons prior to any questioning:

- You have the right to remain silent;

- Anything you say can be used against you in a court;

- You have the right to have an attorney present now and during any future questioning;

- If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed to you free of charge if you wish.

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Racial Justice Act of 2009 Delays Death Penalty Executions in North Carolina

 

The controversial Racial Justice Act, a 2009 law that allows death row prisoners to use statistical evidence of discrimination to appeal their sentence, has played a part in the stalemate of carrying out death sentences in North Carolina. But so have other prisoner appeals that question whether the state’s execution method is cruel and unusual or their crimes were investigated fairly.

North Carolina, which has 156 prisoners on death row, has not executed an inmate since Aug. 18, 2006, when Samuel R. Flippen was put to death by lethal injection for the beating death of his two-year-old step daughter.  Since then, a complex and evolving set of legal challenges have imposed a de facto moratorium on the death penalty in North Carolina.

The complete article entitled: Complex challenges put NC death penalty on life support, written by Mark Binker, can be found on WRAL.com.