RICO (The Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act)

RICO (The Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act)United States Federal Law does everything in its power in order to combat the continuing growth of criminal organizations. One of the countermeasures initiated in 1970, is an Act relating to the control of organized crime in the United States, also known as RICO (OCCA).

RICO stands for Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act. This term applies to a Federal Law, designed to combat organized groups running illegal business (i.e. racketeering), which may include the importation and sale of illegal drugs, gambling, money laundering, prostitution rings, bribery, drug trafficking, slavery, or any act involving murder, kidnapping, arson, robbery, extortion, dealing with obscene matter, terrorism, bankruptcy or security fraud, helping aliens to enter illegally the country, dealing with controlled substance, etc. Continue reading

Justice: Can you be sued and “not guilty” at the same time?

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How can a civil court force someone to pay a settlement when another court has already said they are not guilty? Guilty – But Not Guilty? It’s true that a person can win a criminal action, but then go on to lose the civil action. It’s because the two actions are brought by different parties and subject to different standards of proof.

The Difference Between Criminal Guilt and Civil Liability

The law distinguishes between criminal guilt and civil liability. In 1995, Simpson was found not guilty of murdering Nicole Simpson and Ron Goldman, but then two years later was found liable to Goldman’s parents for causing Ron’s “wrongful death.”

The explanation is that a “Murder” is a crime, whereas “wrongful death” is a civil wrong, otherwise known as a “tort.” Generally speaking, crimes are established so that society can punish (and, one hopes, deter) morally culpable behavior. Torts, on the other hand, are created to provide compensation to the injured.

not-guilty-graphic-33377572The Difference Between Torts and Crimes

It just so happens that many acts – like killing somebody – are both crimes and torts. But this is not always the case. For example, a failed attempt to commit a murder constitutes a crime (attempted murder), but if the intended victim is not harmed by the attempt, there’s no tort – because there’s nothing to compensate. Conversely, there are plenty of torts that aren’t crimes. Defamation, for example, is the publication of words that damage a person’s reputation. You can be sued for it, but in most jurisdictions there is no corresponding crime.

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