Auto Insurance Fraud Costs Americans $20 to $30 Billion Annually

Auto insurance fraud is becoming a great problem in the United States. Auto insurance agencies are paying billions of dollars each year to cover them, that leads to increased premiums even for those who didn’t commit fraud.

auto

Auto insurance fraud is committed against an insurance company in order to receive financial gain. According to the National Insurance Crime Prevention bureau auto insurance fraud costs Americans $20 to $30 billion annually.

insuranceAuto insurance fraud can be “hard” if it consists of an intentional set up of a situation such as car theft or an automobile accident. Soft insurance fraud is regarded as a minor offense, when a person takes advantage of a situation that has already occurred by pretending that the injuries were more serious that they actually were.

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Does Your Company Need a Driver Safety Program?

 

If your Company has vehicles that are driven by employees or permits employees to use their own vehicles on the job then you should read this article.

According to the United States Labor Department Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA):

  • Every 12 minutes someone dies in a motor vehicle crash,
  • Every 10 seconds an injury occurs and
  • Every 5 seconds a crash occurs.

Since a large number of these accidents occur during the workday or during the commute to and from work, employers often bear the cost of injuries that occur both on and off the job.

Motor vehicle crashes cost employers $60 billion annually in medical care, legal expenses, property damage, and lost productivity. They drive up the cost of benefits such as workers’ compensation, Social Security, and private health and disability insurance. In addition, they increase the company overhead involved in administering these programs.

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Child Safety: How to Use Child Safety Seats Correctly

Every parent, placing his child in a vehicle, should always take into consideration the necessity of safety seats for children and the importance of selecting the right kinds of safety seats. It is crucial to be aware of the times your child should be moved from a rear-facing car seat position to a forward-facing car seat or booster seat. It can literally save your child’s life in case of a car accident.

In celebration of child safety week, the team at Chicco have put together an infographic that in no uncertain terms explains the age and height suggestion for securing your child.

Newborn to Age 2

According to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, babies are at greater risk of injury in crashes. This is because babies’ spines are developing and their heads are large for their bodies. Hence, a child should ride rear-facing in a child safety seat. The baby’s head, neck and spine are cradled by the back of the child safety seat in the case of a frontal crash, which is the most common type of crash.

The following video presents some important child safety seat tips for your baby:

Toddler

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children 2 years or older, or those who have outgrown the weight or height limits for their rear-facing safety seat be restrained in the back seat of the car, in a forward-facing safety seat with harness for as long as possible, up to the highest weight or height allowed by the manufacturer of the safety seat.

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Can a Third Party Texter Be Held as “Negligent” in an Automobile Accident?

In a May 25, 2012 New Jersey Law Journal article written by Mary Pat Gallagher entitled:No Liability Found for Sending Texts to Driver Just Before Crash, a New Jersey Judge held that one can NOT be sued for allegedly helping to cause an accident by texting a driver in a vehicle.

On Sept. 21, 2009, Kyle Best, then 19, was driving his pickup truck on his way home from teaching a swim class at the West Morris YMCA in Randolph when he lost control, crossed the yellow line in Mine Hill and hit David and Linda Kubert on their motorcycle.

The Kuberts claimed that because Best was answering a text from her when he lost control, Colonna was electronically present in Best’s pickup truck and thus, also at fault. They alleged that Colonna knew or should have known that Best was driving when she sent the text. She testified at her deposition that she “may have known.”

While the Kubert’s claim against the negligent driver (Best) is still intact, the person sending the text has no liability in the accident.