Has your child been accused of a crime? Find out what you should know about Juvenile Crimes

Juvenile delinquency known as juvenile offending or youth crime is participation in illegal behavior by minors.

Criminal defendants who haven’t quite reached the age of majority (18 in most states) go through a different criminal justice system than the one most people are familiar with.

juvenile (1)Let’s find out the differences between Juvenile Proceedings and Adult Criminal Proceedings:

Juveniles commit “delinquent acts” not “crimes,” and juvenile offenders have “adjudication hearings” not “trials.” The punishment of juvenile offenders also differs significantly from the punishment of adult criminals. The purpose of an adult sentence is to PUNISH, when the purpose of a juvenile sentence is primarily to REHABILITATE the juvenile so that he can go on to live a productive adult life.

juvenile

The juvenile justice system is much different than the adult system and you need a lawyer who can give your child the best chances of success throughout the complex legal process.

Continue reading

How Does The Criminal Justice System Work?

Criminal justice system is meant to control crime and prosecute those who violate laws. Asking yourself how does the criminal system work? Well, a case begins with:

ccc

  • investigation of the crime by the law enforcement officers
  • gathering evidence to identify the perpetrator and use it against them
  • making an arrest
  • examination of the evidences by the court and determining whether the defendant is guilty or not
  • if guilty, the convicted party will go to prison or receive probation.

Continue reading

Baltimore Prison Scandal – Sex, Drugs & Racketeering

The Washington Post article written by Anne E. Marimow and John Wagner entitled: 13 corrections officers indicted in Md., accused of aiding gang’s drug scheme presents a shocking account of the Prisoners Running the Prison.Thirteen female correction officers at the Baltimore City Detention Center essentially turned over the facility to Tavon (a/k/a “Bulldog” and “Tay”) White, leader of the Black Guerilla Family Gang. 

On April 23, 2013, the U.S. Attorney’s Office issued a Press Release announcing that a federal grand jury returned a racketeering indictment charging 25 individuals, including 13 correctional officers with the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, for conspiring to run operations of the Black Guerilla Family (BGF) gang inside correctional facilities. All 25 defendants also are charged with conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute drugs, and 20 of the defendants are charged with money laundering conspiracy.

Continue reading

DNA test without a warrant

The Court has decided the police can sample your DNA without a warrant. Thus, anyone arrested for a felony, even the individuals who were never convicted, can now be tested. The tests’ results are uploaded to state and federal crime database.

Pros and cons

Some law agencies hope DNA testing can be a reliable identification tool rather than names, appearance and fingerprints. Proponents say it is a valuable tool which can investigate unsolved crimes. It can also help separate violent offenders from other people. For example, a Maryland study shows that 20 crimes could have been prevented if just 3 arrested were sampled.

Opponents claim it violates the Fourth Amendment which guards against unreasonable searches and seizures. As a result, in a number of state and federal courts there were cases when the law faced conflicting results. The case by the Maryland Court of Appeals held the practice unconstitutional. It happened earlier this year. A DNA sample was taken from a man who was arrested in 2009 on assault. It matched evidence from an unsolved rape. Later on, he was convicted and charged by the state based on the match.

Removing your DNA data

If you have been arrested for a felony you did not commit, you can have your records removed from the database. Only eight states offer automatic deletion of these records. In the remaining 17 states arrestees must contact authorities to ask that their records be removed.

More information here: http://blogs.lawyers.com/2012/10/the-police-can-test-your-dna-without-a-warrant/