Getting Out of Jail by Setting a Bail

A person’s first thought after being arrested and put in jail is often how Get-out-of-jail-300x190to get out and fast! The usual way to do it is to post a bail.

Bail is cash, a bond or a piece of property that has a cash value, that a defendant gives as a guarantee that he or she will appear in court when ordered to do so. In general, if a defendant shows up to court when he or she is supposed to after being released from a jail, the court will return the bail. BUT if he or she DOES NOT show up, the court will keep the bail and most likely issue a warrant for the defendant’s arrestjail-bail-guy

Judges are responsible for setting a bail. Commonly many people want to get out of jail immediately instead of waiting a day or longer to see a judge, that’s why most jails have standard bail schedules that specify bail amounts for common crimes. Where a defendant poses a threat to the safety of the community, he or she may be held without bail.

After being released a defendant may be required to: limit travel; maintain or seek employment; undergo drug and alcohol testing; comply with a curfew; comply with periodic check-ins with authorities; refrain from possession of a firearm etc.

Continue reading

Drunk Driving or Alcohol Behind the Steering Wheel

Have you been arrested for drunk driving? Well, your case is not the only one. In 2011 over 1.2 million drivers were arrested in U.S. for drunk driving.

alk

Drunk driving refers to the process of operating a motor vehicle while the driver is under the influence of alcohol. This is also known as driving under the influence (DUI) or driving while intoxicated (DWI). In order to prove that you are drunk the police officer can administrate you the Breathalyzer test, if you blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is over a set limit, you are charged with drunk driving. In most of the cases the BAC limit is 0.08%. Another drunk driving tests are blood test, urine test and field sobriety test. If a driver refuses to submit such testing, it may lead to enhancement of imposed penalties.

s80-0334-sm_grande_grande

 

Continue reading

Lawyer Involved in $850,000 Illegal Billing Scheme

On August 30, 2012, Mayer Brown’s former Chief Information Officer (“CIO”) David Tresch was arrested by the FBI for embezzling more than $850,000 over the past year.  The government’s complaint alleges that Tresch approved $980,000 in payments to an IT vendor for work that hadn’t been performed between May 2011 and May 2012, and the vendor sent him checks totaling $854,250. Mayer Brown paid the IT vendor almost $8 million between November 2004 and March 2011.  It has also been alleged that Tresch had a financial interest in the IT vendor and had received nearly $1.3 million from the vendor between 2005 and 2001.

Tresch had worked at Mayer Brown, one of Chicago’s oldest, largest and most prominent Chicago law firms since 2005.

It was reported that much of the illegal proceeds were spent on a fleet of vehicles, including a Cadillac DTS, an RV camping trailer, a work van and a mobile home. FBI agents seized Thursday approximately $210,000 in bank accounts controlled by Tresch, as well as a camping trailer, a van, and a luxury automobile.  Tresch was released on a $100,000 partially-secured bond.

For additional information, please read the Above the Law Blog Posting by Christopher Danzig entitled: Mayer Brown’s Former CIO Charged With Defrauding the Firm Out of a Whole Bunch of Money

Chicago Panhandlers File a Class Action Lawsuit

 

Our constitutional rights under the First Amendment give all of us the right to speak what is on our mind.  According to a Wall Street Journal Blog posting by Sam Favate entitled: Chicago Panhandlers File First Amendment Lawsuit, eight Chicago panhandlers decided to enforce their rights by filing a federal lawsuit seeking class action status against the City of Chicago.  Their complaint was filed on the basis that the police make them move from a high end section of Michigan Avenue known as the “Magnificent Mile”.

Interestingly enough, this is not the first time that the City of Chicago has been faced with this type of lawsuit. In 2003., the City settled a class action lawsuit filed on behalf of people arrested or ticketed for panhandling.