WHAT DO LAWYERS DO? AND WHERE?

All lawyers are not alike. They can work in various capacities such as legal and non-legal. Also, they specialize in private areas. Moreover, lawyers do not usually go to trial to win the case as you can watch in movies or on TV. Generally speaking, there are two areas where they usually specialize in:

1. Legal Specializations
Some lawyers specialize in a particular area, the other – in trial law (civil or criminal). They can also help clients who seek to reverse or to uphold lower court decisions, bankruptcy law, tax law, trusts and estates, corporate law, environmental law, intellectual property, communication law, elder law, employment and labor law, entertainment law, health care law, education law, international law, etc. The list of is almost endless.

2. Legal Settings
Lawyers also work in a variety of settings. Some of them are described below.
Private Practice:
The lawyers work in private practice as solo practitioners, in small or “boutique” law firms, in firms that have several hundred lawyers. As usual, they join firms as “associates” and work toward becoming “partners.” Life at a large law firm is influenced by “billable hours.”
In-House:
“In-house” work means that lawyers are employed by a single client or a large corporation. Large companies usually hire one or more lawyers to go through more specific issues. For example, one supervises litigation, another addresses the company’s employment issues, a third lawyer tries to influence legislation related to the company’s business. Also, if in-house lawyers represent only one client, they are not beholden to the “billable hour.”
Government:
The federal government also hire lawyers for different tasks. There are District attorneys, State Attorney Generals, and federal prosecutors who work at the Department of Justice here in D.C. and at U.S. Attorney’s Offices throughout the country and public defenders who represent those who cannot afford an attorney. All of the government representatives also work for the Office of Homeland Security the Environmental Protection Agency, the Security Exchange Commission, the Patent and Trademark Office, the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Similarly, the United States Congress offer many opportunities for lawyers to help pass legislation.
Academia:
Lawyers teach in law schools and colleges. Many of the lawyers get teaching experience first by working as a professor. At the same time they may also work elsewhere full time.

Only some of the legal settings were mentioned in this article. If you want to know more information on the topic, please, visit the link below:

http://www.nalp.org/what_do_lawyers_do