Racial Justice Act of 2009 Delays Death Penalty Executions in North Carolina

 

The controversial Racial Justice Act, a 2009 law that allows death row prisoners to use statistical evidence of discrimination to appeal their sentence, has played a part in the stalemate of carrying out death sentences in North Carolina. But so have other prisoner appeals that question whether the state’s execution method is cruel and unusual or their crimes were investigated fairly.

North Carolina, which has 156 prisoners on death row, has not executed an inmate since Aug. 18, 2006, when Samuel R. Flippen was put to death by lethal injection for the beating death of his two-year-old step daughter.  Since then, a complex and evolving set of legal challenges have imposed a de facto moratorium on the death penalty in North Carolina.

The complete article entitled: Complex challenges put NC death penalty on life support, written by Mark Binker, can be found on WRAL.com.

 


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