How To Apply For Treaty Trader Visa (E-1)

How To Apply For Treaty Trader Visa (E-1)Receiving a visa is one of the most stressful concerns about your journey. It steals your precious time, energy and money, and there is no guaranty that you will receive it after all. In order to prevent any sort of unexpected complications, check out a list of significant things you should know about Treaty Trader Visa (E-1).  

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Investor Visa (E-2) – How to Apply

The U.S.A.United States of America welcomes businessmen and investors who intend to come to the country for business opportunities. If your dream is to live and work legally in the United States, moreover, you possess well-developed business, the E-2 visa is exactly what you need. The E-2 visa is non-immigrant, so-called treaty visa of “Friendship, Commerce and Navigation” between the United States and other countries with which the U.S. has a treaty of commerce, investment and navigation. You may see the list of countries that have treaties with the United States right here.

An investment is the treaty investor’s placing of capital, including funds and/or other assets, at risk in the commercial sense with the objective of generating a profit. So, the E-2 Treaty Investor visa allows a national of a treaty country to be admitted to the United States when investing a substantial amount of capital in the U.S. business.

An interesting fact is that during 2013, there were 173 million non-immigrant admissions to the United States. And 373,360 of these admissions were E-1 to E-3 visas. Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

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What is a Business Visa and How to Apply for One

visa

Business Visa also known as a B1 visa –  is a non-immigrant visa to the USA. It is available for anyone who would like to travel to the U.S. for a short period of time for business related reasons that do not require actual labor work or receiving payment from any U.S. company. A business visa is appropriate for a variety of activities of a commercial or professional nature including, but not limited to:

  • Attending a scientific, educational, professional or business convention or conference on specific dates;
  • Participating in sporting or charity events;
  • Collaboration on independent research at a scientific or educational institution;
  • Short- term training;
  • Meetings with the business partners or negotiating a contract;
  • Settling an estate;
  • Transiting through the U.S. under certain conditions.

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