How to Place a Bid on Legal Bistro

Bid-for-Placement: what does it mean? Why do we need it?

A bid is a sum of money that a lawyer offers for the opportunity of talking to a client, to receive his contact information and discuss his case (the minimum amount you can bid on is 6 law dollars).

It’s important to remember that a lawyer’s bid on a case determines where in the list of competing, “bidding” lawyers their profile will be displayed to the clients, who posted the case. The profile with the highest bid will be displayed first and the lowest, respectively, the last.

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Detroit – The Largest Municipal Bankruptcy Filing in U.S. History – What happened?

On July 18, 2013, the City of Detroit filed for Chapter 9 Bankruptcy making it the largest municipal bankruptcy filing in U.S. history as measured by the amount of outstanding debt.  Detroit is estimated to owe $18-$20 billion in debt over 10,000+ creditors, 100 discrete bond issuances and 50 labor bargaining units. Prior to the Detroit filing, Jefferson County, Alabama’s $4 billion filing in 2011 had been the largest municipal bankruptcy filing in the United States.

So where did things go so horribly wrong?  The above video is the first in a three part series on the Detroit bankruptcy filing. Video #1 concentrates on The Economics of Failure. The video begins with an illustration of demographic trends for the following three major U.S. cities:

  • Dallas – People are solidly moving into Dallas due to limited taxes; limited benefits and reduced regulation;
  • Los Angeles – While the climate of Los Angeles still attracts people to the state, high state income tax and the most restrictive environment regulations in the country are driving many people out of the state of California;
  • Detroit – There is a massive population exodus from Detroit with virtually no immigration due to the city drowning in debt from more than 50 years of democratic mayors running the city. The video cites cronyism, incompetence and crime as some of the major contributors.

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Writing an Effective Biography on Legal Bistro Helps Attorneys Get New Clients!

Why should a lawyer bother to write an outstanding biography and why is it the most important part of the lawyer profile? It’s so simple!

A bio is a snapshot of a lawyer’s professional experience:

  • who they are,

  • what they do,

  • specialist expertise and

  • examples of client work.

A good biography “sells” their expertise to potential new clients.

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Legal Bistro Elevator Pitch for Lawyers

What is an Elevator Pitch?

An “Elevator Pitch”, also known as an elevator speech or statement, is a short summary used to quickly define a person, product, profession or organization and its Value Proposition.  The name “elevator pitch” conveys that the person who is delivering the message has about the same time that it takes the typical elevator to go from the ground floor the top floor to convince their audience about their proposal.  A well designed elevator pitch should be between 30 and 60 seconds.

How to Write a Good Elevator Pitch

The “Elevator Pitch” on Legal Bistro is five lines (500 words maximum) of text that are displayed to potential clients in what we call the “Short Profile Preview”.  This is the very first thing that a potential client will see about you and your law firm so you should give a lot of thought to what you would like to say.

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Why Consumers Love Legal Bistro

 Do you need a lawyer but are intimidated by the legal process?  Are you concerned that professional legal services may be financially out of reach?  Perhaps English is not your native language and you are having trouble finding a qualified attorney with whom you can effectively communicate.  Don’t worry, if you answered yes to any of these questions you are not alone.

We built Legal Bistro because we were inspired by the contribution that Lending Tree made to the process for finding a mortgage lender.  Lending Tree used the power of the Internet to bring online competition in the mortgage application process. Equally important is that Lending Tree’s website has helped consumers to better understand the process of applying for a home loan. We hope that Legal Bistro can achieve similar results in the legal services market.

When Lawyers Compete, You Win!

The single biggest reason why consumers love our service is because Legal Bistro facilitates lawyers competing online to serve the client.  Our Company motto is that When Lawyers Compete, the Client Wins! Frankly, we believe that both lawyers and consumers win when the competitive playing field has been leveled.

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Why Lawyers Love Legal Bistro

    

Are you happy with the current Return on Investment (“ROI”) for your online legal services marketing dollars?  Are you spending too much of your time qualifying leads? wasting time imagesDo you know anything about the visitors to your law firm’s website besides their IP Address and the date and time of their visit?  More specifically, are you being provided with case specific  facts that will help you evaluate their legal needs?

If you have answered yes to some or all of these questions then perhaps you will appreciate why lawyers love Legal Bistro.

YOU ARE IN CONTROL

You decide what cases you see based on the Practice Groups, Case Types and Tag or Key Words used when defining your Areas of Practice.

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Should the United States Government be Permitted to Play the Role of a Venture Capitalist?

  

The United States government has made some very risky investments in areas such as green energy and electric vehicles.  As time as shown, the government’s ability to pick winners and losers has cost the United States taxpayers billions of dollars.

Green Energy, also known as renewable or sustainable energy, is energy that comes from resources which are continually replenished such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, waves and geothermal heat.  According to Wikipedia, About 16% of global final energy consumption comes from renewable sources, with 10% of all energy from traditional biomass, mainly used for heating, and 3.4% from hydroelectricity.

 

These investments have instead provided a string of bankruptcies: Solyndra ($528 million in federal loans), Abound Solar ($400 million), A123 Systems ($279 million) and Fisker Automotive ($529 million), to name the most prominent examples.

Let’s begin with Solyndra, originally founded by Chris Gronet as Gronet Technologies in May of 2005.  The Company changed its name eight (8) months later to Solyndra and quietly began developing a solar module consisting of one glass tube nested inside of another.  Wrapped around the inner tube were 150 solar cells made from copper, indium, gallium and diselenide, rather than silicon.

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More Than 25,000 Americans Want the Death Star Built

 

A Petition entitled Secure resources and funding, and begin construction of a Death Star by 2016 that may have begun as a “lark” by John D of Longmont, CO on November 14, 2012 on Thursday reached the required 25,000-plus signature threshold necessary for the United States Government to provide a formal response.  The petition states:

Those who sign here petition the United States government to secure funding and resources, and begin construction on a Death Star by 2016.

By focusing our defense resources into a space-superiority platform and weapon system such as a Death Star, the government can spur job creation in the fields of construction, engineering, space exploration, and more, and strengthen our national defense.

The petition demands that the Obamma Administration build a Death Star much like the one that was featured in the 1977 Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope.

What is even more fascinating than reaching the required threshold so quickly is the attention that is being demonstrated around the globe.  I am writing this article from Eastern Europe.  More specifically, Balti in the Republic of Moldova.  The petition was brought to my attention by several Java programmers working inside of the Alec Russo University. Apparently many of the students in the University are familiar with this petition so I can only assume that the Internet is spreading the news like wildfire.

In case you are wondering what the project would cost, a February 21, 2012 Forbes article written by Carol Pinchefsky entitled: How Much Would It Cost to Build the Death Star from Star Wars? had the following to say:

Even if you can imagine quite a bit, Centives, the economics blog of students of Lehigh University, says it would cost “$852,000,000,000,000,000. Or roughly 13,000 times the world’s GDP” to build the Death Star…and that’s just the cost of steel production.

 If only our government could be as organized and work as quickly as the construction in the video below:

 

The $400 Billion Government Defense Contract – Lockheed F-35

In a recent Reuter’s article written by Andrea Shalal-Esa entitled:  Pentagon, Lockheed “getting close” on next F-35 contract: Kendall, provides some interesting insights into the world of government defense contracts.  Moreover, the article also sheds some light on the recent tensions between the Pentagon and Lockheed Martin Corporation, the manufacturer of the F-35.

The Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II is a family of single-seat and single engine multipurpose fighters.  The plane has been designed to perform ground attack, reconnaissance and air defense with stealth capabilities.  There are three primary models of the aircraft:

  • F-35A – A conventional takeoff and landing model that descended from the X-35 (the product of the Joint Strike Fighter Program)
  • F-35B – A short take off and vertical model
  • F-35C – A carrier based version of the aircraft

 History

In October 2001, when the U.S. Defense Department awarded Lockheed Martin the contract to develop the Joint Strike Fighter, it looked like the deal of the century for the company and its customer. In the largest defense procurement in history, Lockheed would produce three variants of one stealthy design to replace the mixed and aging fleets of three U.S. services, saving money and time.

Eleven years later and the program has been plagued by cost over runs and technology problems.  On October 26, 2012, the Pentagon announced that it was withholding $46.5 million from Lockheed Martin Corp because of continued flaws with a business system used to track costs and schedules for the F-35 fighter.

The F-35 has been criticized by Pentagon officials and lawmakers for test-performance failings, delays and its ballooning cost. At an estimated $395.7 billion for eventual production of 2,443 planes, the cost is up 70 percent, adjusted for inflation, from the $233 billion projected when Lockheed Martin won the program from Boeing Co. in late 2001.

What’s even more shocking is that maintenance costs for the aircraft are estimated to be $1.1 trillion over the next 50 years. The F-35 program has been restructured three times in recent years, in part to try to cut costs. Earlier this year the Pentagon said “no more money” would be put toward cost overruns and the military would buy fewer planes if costs rose.

The Defense Department is also bracing for sequestration, a process that would cut the military’s budget by $50 billion a year over a decade, on top of more than $50 billion in annual cuts already on the books.

The aircraft employs advanced technology and weapons systems which are controlled by technology. 9.4 million lines of code are required to manage the aircraft.

A helmet is being developed by Vision Systems International (VSI), a joint venture between Israel’s Elbit Imaging and Rockwell Collins succeeds, it will be the most advanced ever built. It is supposed to let pilots see data from all the plane’s sensors, effectively allowing the pilot to look right through the floor of the plane and all around it. But the project has run into problems with night vision, delays in displaying data, jitter under certain conditions, and more recently, a green glow at the visor’s edges and problems with alignment.

Lockheed and the Defense Department are nearing agreement on a long-delayed contract for a fifth batch of F-35 fighter jets, the Pentagon’s chief weapons buyer told Reuters on Wednesday. “I think we’re getting close,” Defense Undersecretary Frank Kendall told Reuters after a speech to an investor conference hosted by Credit Suisse. Kendall said he had “a very positive meeting” on Tuesday with Lockheed President Marillyn Hewson about a range of issues, including the $396 billion F-35 program, the Pentagon’s largest weapons program.