Fraud Crimes. Losses Due to Insurance Fraud. Hard Fraud vs. Soft Fraud

Insurance fraud refers to an intent to obtain some benefits or advantages by means of false andimages misleading information filled in in the insurance document and consists of exaggerated damage or losses that never occurred. According to Crime in the US 2012 FBI Report the total cost of insurance fraud is more than $40 billion per year. In 2011 there were 140 pending insurance fraud cases.

There are two types of insurance fraud:

  1. Soft fraud, that consists of “little harmless lies” in order to maximize the claim.
  2. Hard fraud, that involves falsification of an accident or an injury in order to legally collect money from the insurance agencies.

arson-300x225There are common types of insurance fraud that include: exaggerated injuries, false or exaggerated property loss, car accidents, intentional property damage, arson.

If you don’t want to become a victim of insurance fraud, don’t trust people who sell insurance over the telephone or door-to-door. It is also not wise to give your insurance ID number to people or companies you don’t know. Don’t forget, if an accident occurred to you, make sure you get as much evidence as possible.

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Legal Cartoon

Compliments of Mark Anderson of Andertoons

How to Place a Bid on Legal Bistro

Bid-for-Placement: what does it mean? Why do we need it?

A bid is a sum of money that a lawyer offers for the opportunity of talking to a client, to receive his contact information and discuss his case (the minimum amount you can bid on is 6 law dollars).

It’s important to remember that a lawyer’s bid on a case determines where in the list of competing, “bidding” lawyers their profile will be displayed to the clients, who posted the case. The profile with the highest bid will be displayed first and the lowest, respectively, the last.

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Cost of Obtaining Medical Records is the Latest Obstacle in the Pursuit of Medical Malpractice Claims Against Imprisoned Michigan Oncologist Dr. Farid Fata

Imagine losing a family member or loved one to what you thought was a cancer related death.  One day you read in the newspaper that the Oncologist, Michigan doctor Farid Fata, has been charged with massive Medicare fraud, including giving $35 million in needless chemotherapy to patients. Now you are questioning whether or not the treatments provided by Dr. Fata were in fact even necessary and if those treatments could have been the cause of death.

Jeff Burrs lost his father to kidney failure which occurred during chemotherapy treatments that had been prescribed by Dr. Fata.  Mr. Burrs is now requesting his father’s medical records from Crittenton Hospital in Rochester and has learned the following:

  • Request will take 7-13 days to process;
  • Mr. Burrs will be invoiced a bill for the medical record request;
  • The hospital policy is that when a patient requests medical records for treatment purposes, there is no charge for the service of providing those records.  If the request however; is for personal or legal reasons, there will be a charge to provide the records;
  • Crittenton Hospital uses Medical Records Online, Inc. (“MRO”), a third party provider based in Pennsylvania,  to fulfill all medical record requests;

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Michigan Oncologist Dr. Farid Fata – Medicare Fraud, Villian or Cancer Patient Savior?

 On August 6, 2013, a Criminal Complaint was filed against Michigan Oncologist Dr. Farid Fata in Federal Court in the county of Oakland in the Eastern District of Michigan.  The Defendant was charged by the U.S. Government with Healthcare Fraud in violation of 18 U.S.C. 1347.

In an affidavit in support of the Complaint, Special Agent Brian Fairweather who was employed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (“FBI”) alleges the following violations:

  • Healthcare Fraud – 18 U.S.C. 1347
  • Distribution of Controlled Substances – 21 U.S.C. 841(a)(1)
  • Money Laundering – 18 U.S.C. 1956 and 18 U.S.C. 1957
  • Payment or receipt of Healthcare Kickbacks – 42 U.S.C. 1320a-7(b)(1)(A) and 42 U.S.C. 1320a-7(b)(2)(A)

More specifically, the Complaint alleges the following:

  • Administration of unnecessary chemotherapy to patients in remission
  • Deliberate misdiagnosis of patients having cancer to justify unnecessary cancer treatment
  • Administration of chemotherapy to end-of-life patients who will not benefit from the treatment
  • Deliberate misdiagnosis of patients with cancer to justify expensive testing
  • Fabrication of other diagnoses such as anemia and fatigue to justify unnecessary hematology treatments
  • Distribution of controlled substances to patients without medical necessity

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Legal Bistro Elevator Pitch for Lawyers

What is an Elevator Pitch?

An “Elevator Pitch”, also known as an elevator speech or statement, is a short summary used to quickly define a person, product, profession or organization and its Value Proposition.  The name “elevator pitch” conveys that the person who is delivering the message has about the same time that it takes the typical elevator to go from the ground floor the top floor to convince their audience about their proposal.  A well designed elevator pitch should be between 30 and 60 seconds.

How to Write a Good Elevator Pitch

The “Elevator Pitch” on Legal Bistro is five lines (500 words maximum) of text that are displayed to potential clients in what we call the “Short Profile Preview”.  This is the very first thing that a potential client will see about you and your law firm so you should give a lot of thought to what you would like to say.

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Why Consumers Love Legal Bistro

 Do you need a lawyer but are intimidated by the legal process?  Are you concerned that professional legal services may be financially out of reach?  Perhaps English is not your native language and you are having trouble finding a qualified attorney with whom you can effectively communicate.  Don’t worry, if you answered yes to any of these questions you are not alone.

We built Legal Bistro because we were inspired by the contribution that Lending Tree made to the process for finding a mortgage lender.  Lending Tree used the power of the Internet to bring online competition in the mortgage application process. Equally important is that Lending Tree’s website has helped consumers to better understand the process of applying for a home loan. We hope that Legal Bistro can achieve similar results in the legal services market.

When Lawyers Compete, You Win!

The single biggest reason why consumers love our service is because Legal Bistro facilitates lawyers competing online to serve the client.  Our Company motto is that When Lawyers Compete, the Client Wins! Frankly, we believe that both lawyers and consumers win when the competitive playing field has been leveled.

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Why Lawyers Love Legal Bistro

    

Are you happy with the current Return on Investment (“ROI”) for your online legal services marketing dollars?  Are you spending too much of your time qualifying leads? wasting time imagesDo you know anything about the visitors to your law firm’s website besides their IP Address and the date and time of their visit?  More specifically, are you being provided with case specific  facts that will help you evaluate their legal needs?

If you have answered yes to some or all of these questions then perhaps you will appreciate why lawyers love Legal Bistro.

YOU ARE IN CONTROL

You decide what cases you see based on the Practice Groups, Case Types and Tag or Key Words used when defining your Areas of Practice.

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$6 Billion Cyber Money Laundering Revealed

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Online currency exchange, Liberty Reserve, is accused in laundering $6 billion. It is a central hub for criminals trafficking in everything from stolen identities to child pornography, federal prosecutors in New York said.

According to Preet Bharara, the United States attorney in Manhattan, and other law enforcement officials, it is the largest online money-laundering case in history. The cyber money-laundering scheme included 1 million users worldwide, with more than 200,000 users in the US. Over seven years, 55 million transactions were conducted through Liberty Reserve, the prosecutors said.

From 2006 to 2013, Liberty Reserve became one of the world’s most widely used digital currency services but it appeared to be a “financial hub of the cybercrime world”. The profits from criminal activities were processed anonymously and ranged from identity theft and credit card fraud to computer hacking, investment fraud, child pornography, and drug trafficking.

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Justice: Can you be sued and “not guilty” at the same time?

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How can a civil court force someone to pay a settlement when another court has already said they are not guilty? Guilty – But Not Guilty? It’s true that a person can win a criminal action, but then go on to lose the civil action. It’s because the two actions are brought by different parties and subject to different standards of proof.

The Difference Between Criminal Guilt and Civil Liability

The law distinguishes between criminal guilt and civil liability. In 1995, Simpson was found not guilty of murdering Nicole Simpson and Ron Goldman, but then two years later was found liable to Goldman’s parents for causing Ron’s “wrongful death.”

The explanation is that a “Murder” is a crime, whereas “wrongful death” is a civil wrong, otherwise known as a “tort.” Generally speaking, crimes are established so that society can punish (and, one hopes, deter) morally culpable behavior. Torts, on the other hand, are created to provide compensation to the injured.

not-guilty-graphic-33377572The Difference Between Torts and Crimes

It just so happens that many acts – like killing somebody – are both crimes and torts. But this is not always the case. For example, a failed attempt to commit a murder constitutes a crime (attempted murder), but if the intended victim is not harmed by the attempt, there’s no tort – because there’s nothing to compensate. Conversely, there are plenty of torts that aren’t crimes. Defamation, for example, is the publication of words that damage a person’s reputation. You can be sued for it, but in most jurisdictions there is no corresponding crime.

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