Why Do You Need an Attorney When Buying or Selling a House?

Buying a houseBuying a house will probably be the most significant and the largest financial purchase you will make in your life. Of course, the house buying or selling process is one of the most complex and stressful things that requires much time, knowledge and a lot of effort, but not only. Also, this process involves the law of real estate, because each state has its own requirements and certainly there are different cases and problems demanding special issues of practice in this field of law. A real estate lawyer is specially trained and has enough experience to deal with these problems.  That is why you should start with a consultation with an experienced real estate attorney, who can help you avoid making any mistakes in buying or selling a house.

Home Buying Statistics

The 2013 National Association of Realtors (NAR) has conducted a Home Buyer Survey and it claims that 16% of purchased homes were new houses. The average price for a house was $210,000. The average price for a new house constituted $259,000, and for a previously owned – $196,000.

According to NAR in 2012 the average household income of buyers was $83,300.

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) states that 69,000 suspicious activity reports to mortgage loan fraud were received in 2012. Here you will find more information about home buying/selling statistics.

Who are All of the Parties Who Could be Involved in Your Real Estate Closing?

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Race/Color Employment Discrimination

Discrimination based on color – skin pigment, complexion, shade, or lightness or Discriminationdarkness – is illegal. Color is a separate protected category under Title VII, the primary federal law that prohibits workplace discrimination.

Discrimination based on race and color often overlap. Discrimination because of race means race is the reason, or at least a motivating factor, in an employer’s adverse treatment of an applicant or employee. Discrimination based on race or color can also occur when an employer’s neutral policy or practice disproportionately disadvantages employees of a particular race and there is no legitimate business reason to justify the policy or practice.

An employment policy or practice that applies to everyone, regardless of race or color, can be illegal if it has a negative impact on the employment of people of a particular race or color and is not job-related and necessary to the operation of the business.

Remember! It is unlawful to harass a person because of that person’s race or color!

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